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These are not necessarily in order of appearance within the Act. 

Flight A      Act 1                                       

Closing Time, D Chapelle (2w,1m) – In a quiet café, at the end of the day, a bartender and a solitary old man take a moment to discuss wants, and needs, and the nature of life.

Coffee With Ed, Stephen Enersen (2m) - Features two old guys who meet for coffee every week to bad-mouth each other while discussing the vagaries of life. Today Steve is trying to convince Ed that he shouldn’t give Christmas presents.

Cruel to Be Kind, Paula Ray (1w,4m) - is the story of two young outsiders lost in the American Midwest learning lessons of the heart in the sometimes fallow fields of life

In N Out, John Burkhart (1w,1m) - A story about two strangers who meet in a cafe located in a deserted town and share their past experiences.

Sing Daisy for Me, Cec Burkhart (2w) - is the story of a woman in a wheelchair and the being who rescued her from a fire in a diner. They discuss their relationship before she dies.

The Wave, Paul Burrow (2?) - An over-caffeinated denizen of a busy coffee shop deflects another customer attempting to share the table, in his own unique way.

 Act 2                                       

The Way It Is, Charisa Ramsey (1w,1m) - Love can be a mine field of things you're not supposed to say and not supposed to do. So what happens when one of those mines goes off without your knowledge? The Way It Is explores the importance of standing up for the things you believe in, and the people you love. 

The Beast, D Chapelle (2?) – A theatre producer sits down with her playwright to discuss the meaning of life, the universe, Count Dracula, and the importance of deadlines.

Knock Three Times, Andy Dillehay (3w) - A mourning woman dips her toes into the world of spiritualism to connect with a lost love.

The Male Brain, Paul Burrow (1m,3?) - The stage and contents represent key components of the male brain belonging to a walker off-stage. The response of the brain to an oncoming female jogger, also off-stage, is recorded.

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Flight B         Act 1        

Just A Drill, Jillian Carter (1w,1 Child) - is the story of what happens when a mother does not have all the answers, but still has to find a way to help her young child deal with school shootings

Make My Decision For Me, Brian Bornstein (2w) - explores the relationship between two women of different ages who work in an office that provides professional decision-making advice.

Shall We Dance, Brigid Amos (2w) - Long-simmering resentment bubbles to the surface when a dance teacher and her former student attempt to share a studio.

Swipe Left, D Chapelle (2w) – A harried businesswoman takes some time for herself on a sunny park bench which takes a dark turn when she is joined by a younger woman with a dark secret

 Act 2                                       

Two Pink Lines, Jillian Carter (2w,1m) - is an awkward but hopeful moment in the life of a couple struggling with fertility issues and the pregnant woman stuck with them in a doctor's waiting room.

Untitled, Stephen Enersen (1w,1m) - Carla suddenly demands a redefinition of their relationship and the part sex plays in it; Jake is confused and clueless

Wheelchair, Brian Bornstein (1?) - a monologue, told by a person recently confined to a wheelchair, about how they got there and maybe--just maybe--why they got there.

The Bereaved Widow, by JudyRae (1w.1m or 2 w) - Comedy highlighting gossip and expectations at a funeral.

A Cool Margarita, by D Chapelle - – A young couple take a break in a quiet café before a very important appointment. One of them may be having second thoughts.

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Flight C    (Malcolm)                        

A Good Plan, by Robin Buckallew (4f,1m) - Allie needs something she doesn’t have. She comes up with a foolproof plan to get what she needs. The problem is, foolproof plans always have a way of going wrong.

Blue Screen, by Robin Buckallew (2?++) - Plato and Zero are bored with their existence. It seems like they are stuck in a rut, and they are not able to use their superior intellects in their present job. When you are a computer, there may be ways to amuse yourself, but even that can become unsatisfying over time. They need a longer term solution.

Playbiill Playball, by Linda Cooke (3A, 1 teen) - Courtney and her mom Georgia report to the principal’s office to say they are tired of school sports running roughshod over education and the arts. They are suing Paterno High school, claiming that the school has established sports as a religion.

Quodlibet, by Paul Burrow (many) - The rehearsal room is double-booked but directors and actors from two different plays insist on using it. No one will yield, and thus a southern melodrama and a tense moment between two Roman soldiers are rehearsed simultaneously. The directors attempt to get even.

# Studly Superhero, by Robin Buckallew (1m,1f +++) - Neil loves his computer, and spends most of his time with it, but neverexpected to find himself inside. The only friend he can find is Valerie, a woman he never met before who also got pulled inside her computer. He has no idea how to get out, and it seems everyone else in there is a troll who wants to hurt him.

Worryfull Life, by Linda Cooke (2?) - spirit guide Clarice shows compulsive worrywart Jordan Hailey how dismal the world would be if all his endless apprehensions came true. Clarice hopes to make Jordan see that he really does have … a wonderful life. 

Dogtown, by Robin Buckallew (1?) - Rover needs to persuade the new citizen in town of the importance of paying his taxes, but the taxpayer insists on treating him like a dog. This would be awful, but, well, Rover is a dog.

The Male Brain, Paul Burrow (1m, 3??)

Producer's Nightmare, Paul Burrow  (many) - A collection of issues arising from interactions between actors, the director and the playwright have woven themselves into an opening-night-mare in the fevered brain of the producer.

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in Reserve                                                                   

A Very Tenderly Christmas, by Andy Dillehay - Dad’s dead. The house burnt down. A filthy family holds a post-funeral luncheon at the VFW hall.                 

And That Was That, by D Chapelle - A woman picks home field advantage to breakup with her current boyfriend. Breaking up is hard to do but it’s worse when you’re breaking up with a perfectly good younger guy.                      

Dog Town, by Robin Buckallew -  Rover needs to persuade the new citizen in town of the importance of paying  his taxes, but the taxpayer insists on treating him like a dog. This would be awful, but, well, Rover is a dog.

Humpty Dumpty, by Stephen  Enersen  - Humphrey Dumpert, a retired White House insider under indictment, isvisited by one of the president’s henchmen and warned not to testify against the president.                  

Do You Believe, Stephen Enersen  (1m,1f) - At a family dinner where Rob is introducing his new fiancé for the first time, curmudgeonly Uncle Hugo calls Madison stupid for believing in God. Madison is devastated at first, then rallies to challenge the uncle.

Blue Screen, by Robin Buckallew (2?++) - Plato and Zero are bored with their existence. It seems like they are stuck in a rut, and they are not able to use their superior intellects in their present job. When you are a computer, there may be ways to amuse yourself, but even that can become unsatisfying over time. They need a longer term solution.